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  • The Internet is watching

    *Is never EVER going to get a webcam*

    There are scary people in the internet...
    What makes me a good demoman? If I were a BAD demoman I wouldn't be sitting here, discussing it with you, now would I?! One crossed wire, one wayward pinch of potassium chlorate, one errant twitch, and KABLOOIE!...T'all you fine dandies so proud, so cock-sure...Prancin' aboot with your heads full of eyeballs! Come and get me I say! I'll be waiting on ya with a whiff of the 'ol brimstone. I'm a grim bloody fable....with an unhappy bloody end!

  • #2
    What web site was she using for that? Sounds like amusing watching, though I wouldn't do it. Not only would I be boring to watch, it's better to be yourself when alone

    Comment


    • #3
      She uses UStream.

      And chill out folks, you only broadcast when you want to. You have to log in and all that. It's not like a constant window by which you get constantly perved. YOU CHOOSE when you get perved.
      "I like my tea like I like my women - Hot, Wet and Green."
      – IK the Troll

      Comment


      • #4
        There are several like that. Stickam's another, but it's flaky, shaky software.

        The internet, however, is watching. "Seriously. All the ISP's are doing it. We're filtered. The link below explains that we can't access certain pages on Wikipedia because our ISP's are now filtering out content they deem to be illegal - an album cover of The Scorpions featuring a nude child. If you do not want arrested in today's police state then do not follow any of the links in the article to the actual album cover."
        When I was fifteen, my father thought I knew nothing. When I was twenty-five, I was amazed by how little he thought I'd learned in such a long time.

        Comment


        • #5
          Oo! OO!

          I was there when the cleavage-appreciation happened!

          That was fun.
          It's all fun and games until someone loses an eyeball. Then...
          Hey, free eyeball!
          ----------------------
          Originally posted by Leffy
          wussy. its not the teeth you should fear


          its the jaw strength and determination to hang on.

          Comment


          • #6

            I've been watching the controversy over this. The funniest thing is that the album WITH the nude child on the cover can still be bought in the UK (where this filtering is happening) Amazon was still selling it yesterday with that cover (and i *gasp* SAW IT!!!!!) The cover was hardly pornographic, though it certainly was in poor taste.

            of MUCH more concern is the situation outlined in Neil Gaiman's blog about censoring graphic novels.

            Comment


            • #7
              As I said in reply to the post quoted above:

              You can't tell people to look up "My Lai" any more. You can't even do an images.google search for Vietnam without creating (in your browser's cache) an image of a naked child. If you search "fine art" you'll get (copies of) drawn images of naked children, and drawn / sketched / painted counts too here, thanks to our delightful government.

              If they want you, they can find a way to get you with at least a few of the thousands of new offences they've invented and the ones that existed before 1997, and then they only have to say they found something of concern and you're muddy forever. Throw enough mud, some sticks. Bullshit actually sticks better.

              So how do we tell people about what happened in My Lai? How do we tell people about Abeer Qasim Hamza al-Janabi? Is it illegal to describe what happened to her in any detail yet? So much for learning from history. Great. Now we get to do it all again ... and it's probably illegal to even report it.

              I suppose Chugworth Academy's illegal to view now too, and I'm not really sure we can legally own Strangers in Paradise.

              At this rate knowledge will become contraband by default, and we'll be right back to the Dark Ages, but with modern weapons in the hands of the oppressors.

              Everyone'll be scared of everyone else, it'll be illegal not to inform on someone ... unless they're in the clergy and/or government ... and it'll all do NOTHING to protect most victims of child abuse, because it's not like it's only done for the sake of internet audiences, by strangers inspired by seeing it on the 'net, is it? It's a sight older than cameras.

              *sigh* They lap it up, you know. The semi-literate Sun readers will agree with anything as long as the spin on it matches their prejudices. They'd all be in favour of making Muslims wear a crescent on their clothing and tattooing serial numbers and bar codes on immigrants' arms to make them easier to track.
              When I was fifteen, my father thought I knew nothing. When I was twenty-five, I was amazed by how little he thought I'd learned in such a long time.

              Comment


              • #8
                I know they're not watching me the whole time but I still unplug my computer at night. It's in my bedroom now and the new monitor makes that high pitched dog whistle sound if it's plugged in. But also the camera makes me nervous.

                "Neil Gaiman's blog about censoring graphic novels."
                dowhahuh? see, now I'm going to get no e-mails answered this morning. gotta go hunt this down...

                Comment


                • #9
                  One can also drape a bandana or a sock or something over the cam to assure privacy.
                  "I like my tea like I like my women - Hot, Wet and Green."
                  – IK the Troll

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I just googled exactly that. Top of page two:

                    Reactions to story from Neil Gaiman's Journal

                    Why defend freedom of icky speech?
                    http://journal.neilgaiman.com/ 2008/ 12/ why-defend-f...

                    This is a bit long. Apologies. I'd meant to talk about other things, but I started writing this reply this morning and got a bit carried away. I have questions about the Handley case. What makes lolicon something worth defending? Yaoi, as I understand it, isn't necessarily child porn, but the lolicon stuff is all about sexualizing prepubescent girls, yes? And haven't there been lots of credible psych studies saying that if you find a support community for a fetish, belief or behavior, you're more likely to indulge in it?


                    Freedom of Speech (Just Watch What You Say)
                    http://www.reason.com/blog/show/130347.html
                    7 days ago in Hit & Run - Reason Magazine · Authority: 1,927

                    Neil Gaiman, the acclaimed author of Sandman, American Gods, and many other superb works of fantastic fiction, has a very long and very good post at his blog on why defending freedom of speech sometimes means "defending the right of people to read, or to write, or to say, what you don't say or like or want said." He's writing in response to the case of Christopher Handley, an Iowa man facing up to 20 years in prison for possessing comic books that allegedly depict minors engaged in sexual activity. These aren't photographs, it's worth repeating, they're illustrations. Here's Gaiman: When I was writing Sandman, about eighteen years ago, I had thought that the Marquis de Sade would make a fine character for my French Revolution story (I loved the fact that at the time he was a tubby, asthmatic imprisoned for his refusal to sentence people to death) and realised I ought to read his books, rather than commntaries on them, if I was going to put him in my story. I discovered that the works of DeSade were, at that time, considered obscene and not available in the UK, and that UK Customs had declared them un-importable. I bought them in a Borders the next time I was in the US, and brought them through customs looking guilty. (You can now get De Sade in the UK. The arrival of internet porn in the UK meant that the police stopped chasing things like that.) [...] Freedom to write, freedom to read, freedom to own material that you believe is worth defending means you're going to have to stand up for stuff you don't believe is worth defending, even stuff you find actively distasteful, because laws are big blunt instruments that do not differentiate between what you like and what you don't, because prosecutors are humans and bear grudges and fight for re-election, because one person's obscenity is another person's art. Because if you don't stand up for the stuff you don't like, when they come for the stuff you do like, you've already lost. Whole thing here. reason on the panic over virtual porn here and here.


                    Neil Gaiman explains why he opposes laws banning speech he disagrees with
                    http://www.boingboing.net/2008/12/01...an-explains.ht...
                    When I was fifteen, my father thought I knew nothing. When I was twenty-five, I was amazed by how little he thought I'd learned in such a long time.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Two clicks fromt here:
                      Why defend freedom of icky speech?

                      This is a bit long. Apologies. I'd meant to talk about other things, but I started writing this reply this morning and got a bit carried away.
                      I have questions about the Handley case. What makes lolicon something worth defending? Yaoi, as I understand it, isn't necessarily child porn, but the lolicon stuff is all about sexualizing prepubescent girls, yes? And haven't there been lots of credible psych studies saying that if you find a support community for a fetish, belief or behavior, you're more likely to indulge in it? That's why social movements are so important for oppressed or non-mainstream groups (meaning everything from the fetish community to free-market libertarianism) -and why NAMBLA is so very, very scary (they are, essentially, a support group for baby-rapists.)

                      The question, for me, is even if we only save ONE child from rape or attempted rape, or even just lots of uncomfortable hugs from Creepy Uncle Dave, is that not worth leaving a couple naked bodies out of a comic? It is, after all, more than possible to imply and discuss these issues (ex. if someone loses their virginity at 14, and chooses to write a comic about it) without having a big ol' pic of 14 yr. old poon being penetrated as the graphic. I also think there's a world of difference between the Sandman story-which depicts child rape as the horrific thing it is (and, I believe, also ends with a horrific death for the pervert, doesn't it?) and depicting child rape as a sexy and titillating thing. I think there is also a difference between acknowledging children's sexuality, and pornography about children that is created for adults. Where on this spectrum does something like lolicon fall? And, again, why do you, personally, think that it should be defended?

                      Thanks for reading my ramble, and for being accessible to us, and engaged in things like CBLDF. Mostly, they are a fantastic org., but I'm really on the fence with this case...

                      Jess
                      Let me see if I can push you off the fence, a little. I'm afraid it's going to a long, and probably a bit rambly answer -- a credo, and how I arrived at that.

                      ...
                      Yes, it is quite long.
                      When I was fifteen, my father thought I knew nothing. When I was twenty-five, I was amazed by how little he thought I'd learned in such a long time.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JennieB View Post
                        "Neil Gaiman's blog about censoring graphic novels."
                        dowhahuh? see, now I'm going to get no e-mails answered this morning. gotta go hunt this down...

                        The universe is REALLY small. I just read UrsulaV's livejournal entry this morning and realized that SHE is the person in your comic strip porn shop visit. ... And Ursula pointed me to the Neil Gaimen blog here:http://ursulav.livejournal.com/835827.html


                        Ursula herself wrote a brilliant blog about the censorship:
                        "My Autobiography Is Now Illegal
                        http://ursulav.livejournal.com/833981.html

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yep...

                          Lets stick to the topic at hand about the inernet camera watching and Ursala's rack

                          because the recent topic shift is really something that would wind up on fratching, seeing as most of us here are very opinionated about people trying to fuck with our comics/books and general censorship...
                          ***I'm quiet in a homicidal yet to kill people sorta way***

                          RazorJAK says "Evil panda is ... evil. "

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